Reading the news online

I have restricted myself to reading the news online

Over the last few weeks I have restricted myself to reading the news online (as against print copy).  On a Sunday I typically scan the following online: Sunday Independent, Sunday Times (Ireland edition), Sunday Tribune and Sunday Business Post (not available until later).  Many attractions include: free, no pile of paper to get rid of, easy to index anything of interest (using www.faviki.com), easy to search for what’s of interest.  So what are the disadvantages? – reading on my computer screen is a strain, reading at a laptop in the lounge area seems less sociable that actually flicking through newspapers where you can handon the paper to someone else in the room.  There is also a perception (for others and for myself) that because I work in the information systems sector when I am using a computer (even to read the news) I am working.

To some extent reading the news online faciliates greater social newtorking (tagging, indexing, etc) but impacts negatively on the immediate social network – the people with whom you live.

Where is cloud computing in Ireland?

The offerings are global – and available (Amazon, Google, Salesforce, etc.).  There are attractions particularly in terms of avoiding major capital expenditure, scaling the infrastructure investment as demand for the business application grows. The 'private cloud' is now also an option.  There are concerns – how do I pick the right vendor, will it prove expensive in the long run?  However it seems to me that for a country like Ireland and for entrepreneurs here trying to build out businesses to kickstart our serious challenged economy, cloud computing offers a great way to push forward, with limited capital outlay but all the scalability to build web/ global business.

Dion Hinchcliffe's well thought out piece provides a more comprehensive list of some of the pros & cons.  Time to move forward.

a national CTO

Seems incoming President Obama is considering appointment of a CTO for the US.  Not that surprising when you remember how effectively the Obama campaign used technology in the case to the White House.  But perhaps we could benefit from following this idea in Ireland – as we look to up our ranking in the R&D world.  Undoubtedly we have made real progress in areas such as ROS.  However there continune to be opportunities to streamline how the citizen and businesses interact with government.

Knowledge management and the web

We’ve been listening to politicians and academics promoting the knowledge economy – the opportunity for Ireland as a knowledge economy, rather the imperative for Ireland to succeed as a knowledge economy.  Latest references I heard were extracts from the Green Party Conference today.

The web is offering all of us fantastic opportunities to  embrace the concept of the ‘knowledge economy’.  The development of technologies including wikis, blogs, tagging – all facilitate greater learning and sharing of information.  Web 2.0 provides the opportunity to reengineer and accelerate knowledge management.

The recent AIIM survey indicates quite a low level awareness and understanding of web 2.0 across a broad, international population http://www.aiim.org/viewpdfa.asp?ID=34508.

It would be interesting to research the level of understanding and penetration of web2.0 in Irish business, education and community life.

Adoption of web 2.0 in quieter Ireland

Interesting pitch from Andrew McAfee today recession technology proposing that perhaps a slowing US economy actually provides an opportunity for greater penetration of web 2.0 in business – does not necessitate major captial outlay and may benefit from some time being available whcih was not previously available.