GAA and coaching – playing to learn

Àttended the GAA Games Development Conference at Croke Park on Saturday 11th January. Excellent conference and excellent facilities.

The Conference focused on coaching children – as against youth or adult.  And the presentations stuck with the theme and presented a number of interesting ideas from a range of different perspectives.

Paudie O’Neill and Jodie O’Connor reminded us of the different focus at different age groups:

  • Child: Play to Learn
  • Youth: Learn to compete
  • Adult: Compete to win

This is not to say that all adult sport is about ‘play to win’ – but rather to remind us that with children we need to remember: they are playing to learn (not to satisfy the appetites of adults or clubs for wins and silverware).

They reminded us of how disappointed the likes of Paudie O’Shea, Brian O’Driscoll and Ronan O’Gara have been when left out of teams – this is not something we should be visiting on kids who are playing to learn.  We need to avoid any potential exclusion of kids at training or on match day.  And Go Games provide us with the perfect environment to ensure everyone is equally involved.

Having had kids play in Croke Park – through the bunscoileanna competitions – I have had the great joy of watching them play.  Have also, unfortunately, seen the huge disappointment for kids, parents and grandparents when their team gets to Croke Park but the kids do not get to play. Surely we need a way to use the Go Games format to ensure all get to play on the Croke Park days?  Otherwise schools risk winning the cup and losing the child.

Made reference to a recent article by Gary Lineker about pushy parents and their net contribution from the sideline to the development of kids (when the kids are playing to learn).  They don’t get it.

For those of us who are encouraged to stream kids at an early age their advice was clear: ‘Don’t try to predict the stars’.  (Mickey Whelan was even more direct later on: there should be no hierarchy amongst players before the age of 12).

And finally, a reminder for coaches: If you want to correct something: use the sandwich model: praise, correct, praise.

Excellent presentation by Paudie O’Neill and Jodie O’Connor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflecting on a week of sport (well 8 days)

Back in Croke Park today to see Clare beat Limerick in the All Ireland Hurling SemiFinal.  Today I was in the ‘neutral’ role  unsure whether supporting Clare or Limerick.  In the end Clare were comfortable winners.  Last Sunday attended Dublin Cork All Ireland Hurling Semifinal in Croke Park – Cork won by four points.  Was not neutral and was very disappointed to see Dublin beaten.  Some controversy over referee sending off of one Dublin player – although really came down to decision to award yellow card very early in the game.  Got over my bias in favour of Dublin: great game, great spectacle and Cork were just about worth their win.

Last Wednesday attended All Ireland Minor Girls’ Football FInal (actually replay) in Mullingar  – Dublin v. Galway.  With last kick of the game in 8th minute of injury time Galway scored a goal to win by two points.  Have not witnesses such devastation in a long time as that seen in the Dublin camp.  Two well matched teams.  Possibly Galway a little sharper in attack.  Dublin had come back with two very late goals in the first match  so this time it was Galway’s turn.  I am sure the Dublin management must rue the decisions to put five subs on – seemed to disrupt their play and coincided with Galway revival.

Last Friday attended Intermediate Ladies Football Dublin Championship Final in Newcastle, Co. Dublin.  What a beautiful pitch. My own Club, Kilmacud Crokes, were beaten by two points by a very experienced Thomas Davis team.  Great game of football – and right through to the final whistle there were opportunities for either team to win the game.  Another opportunity for promotion just missed by Kilmacud Crokes.

So – not a great return in terms of seeing my teams (Dublin, Dublin, Kilmacud Crokes) losing three times.  But have to say felt privileged to see so many excellent games – served up by amateur players who give so freely of their own time (as do mentors,families, coaches and friends).  I would also be confident that each of the players on those losing teams has gained hugely from the experience – being part of a committed team, achieving such high standards of play and learning from the games themselves.