Older people

Respect and celebrate older people. Today is International Day of the Older Person.

Check out details on the UN page.

In Ireland we recognise that people are living to an older age – and we should celebrate this.  But we also often seem to see this as a problem – as a financial burden – that an increasing proportion of the population will be old and will require more support from a decreasing proportion of younger people.  I just think we have not thought this out.  It is good that people live longer.  Necessarily people will require support for longer – pensions will have to payout for longer, healthcare will need to be available to older people for longer.  But this is progress.  and the objective must be to promote indepdent living for people for as long as is possible.

I think the recent development whereby state pension eligibility is being pushed back to 68 and eventually 70 is an example of a part thought out solution.  This will save the government money in the first instance.  But many of these people find themselves in employment contracts which see their employment ending at 65.  And many of these people are well capable of continuing to work past the age of 65.  But the economics have not actually been worked out.  It may be that people will not want to continue in full employment, that they may want to take on a less physically demanding role, that they may be willing to work at a different level in their current organisation.  But after a career with an organisation they have no entitlement to such arrangements – yet the government sees fits to defer their state pension.

The answers are not necessarily straightforward.  For the companies extended contracts may change their people cost ratio – with relatively expensive human resources being retained in an organisation and potentially ongoing commitments to continue to support pension contributions.

But it is International Day of the Older Person today – and when I read two Sunday newspapers I saw no discussion/ celebration of people living longer.  Let’s make this an Older PErson friendly world – since most of us have an objective of living healthily to an old age.

 

 

Why do teams win? What do we learn from winning teams?

Just attended 6 Gaelic Football and Hurling finals over the last 10 days or so. Five of the teams I supported were successful – so an unusually high success rate! And of course we are often told we learn more from the games we lose (and mistakes we make) than from winning games. But I was thinking – what did we learn from winning these games?

Firstly – winning beats losing. There is no ‘could have, should have, would have’ chat after the game. And, in general, the things that went wrong are put to one side and the focus tends to be on what went right.

Why did five of these teams win?

The first team was well coached, had set achievable targets for itself early in the season, had sorted out its defence and had realistic expectations of its own players (and their abilities). The coaches were meticulous in their preparation – including their analysis of strengths and weaknesses of the opposition. On the day the team made a fast start and played with hunger and determination throughout the match.

The second team to win consisted of a teams of winners. They had lots of ability and had been undefeated in Championship matches for a number of  years. The opposition played well but may have lacked some vital element of self belief. The opposition started well and had opportunities to establish a decent lead – but squandered these.  The winning team started poorly but never appeared to doubt their own ability to close out the deal. And they did so comprehensively in the end.

The third team won by one point in extra time. They played a good game – against another team of approx. equal ability and drive/ hunger. Match came down to a couple of missed opportunities for one team and a couple of opportunities taken by the other team. Would not be difficult to summarise by saying ‘they got the breaks’.

The fourth team won because they had more ability, more experience and generally shut out the up and coming opposition. Their pre-match preparation was good and after a slow start for 5-10 minutes they gradually assumed control in the match.  As the match progressed they began to exploit some weaknesses in the opposition team.

The fifth team was too strong for the opposition and won out easily.  They were faster, stronger, more skillful and, in particular, had more consistently good players across the park that the opposition.  

The sixth team lost.  This team was probably expected to win – just about.  They led well at half time.  Something happened after half time – a real momentum swing.  They seemed to lose their way for 15 minutes of the second half.  Over the game they conceded three goals – and, as many say, goals win matches.  The winning team exploited the momentum swing and just about held out in the end.

So what did I learn from watching six finals?

  • Winning and losing teams learned lots about themselves and the opposition in each game
  • Individual ability of team members makes huge difference
  • Attitude is very important
  • Experience is an asset
  • Good preparation (ambition/ focus, training, tactics, knowledge of the opposition) can make a major difference
  • Luck makes a difference in tight matches
  • Understanding limitations of your own team is important in setting out to win a match
  • Winning teams believe in themselves and their ability to win – even when faced by adversity
  • In many matches the top players on either side neutralise each other – the battle often gets decided by the weaker players – the team with the stronger weaker players usually exploits this advantage to win
  • Beware of momentum swings – over the 6 games there were plenty of changes in momentum – when teams trailing were afforded the opportunity to change things around.  The challenge having survived to the momentum swing opportunity is to take it and kick on.  Really only saw this happen in the sixth final.

Interestingly no real reference to individual leadership, per se, in these match wins.  Yes – good players were required to perform – but impact of individual leadership not as great as people may expect.

Certainly analysis is applicable to lots of work and life situations – why do teams succeed/ fail? Perhaps the importance of strong weaker players is overlooked in many situations – as also is having realistic expectations of the team. Other factors such as preparation and common goals/ sense of purpose were as expected.

 

Review of @AJKeen #digital vertigo

One of the very few books I have reread.

Andrew Keen’s book is a brilliant critique of social networking as we know it.

Keen did his research – be that it looking back to ancient philosophers, the history of computing, social change in the US and globally – and has managed to explain much of what has happened.

The book is interesting in that he builds it (1) around his interactions at a conference in Oxford, with a number of the  ‘leading lights’ of social networking and (2) the characters of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie, ‘Vertigo’.  He  quotes widely from those who promote the benefits of  social networking and those, like himself, who doubt its real value.

He does not mince his words (P118) – ‘you see, social media has been so ubiquitous, so much the connective tissue of society that we’ve all become like Scottie Ferguson, victims of a creepy story that we neither understand nor control…It’s a postindustrial truth of increasingly weak community and a rampant individualism of super-nodes and super-connectors’.

The references alone could tie you up for weeks.  But I believe he has done all of us a service in highlighting what’s wrong with much of what is being put over as good for society.  Well worth taking the time to read.

How to be black?

Baratunde Thurston at ROFLCon II
Baratunde Thurston at ROFLCon II (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

First came across Baratunde Thurston on the TWIT show – as a panellist on Leo Laporte‘s show.  And Leo plugged the book hard.

Just finished listening to the book via Audible.  Have to say thought it was a great listen (and therefore read). Baratunde Thurston is, amongst other things, a black comedian. I found the book thought provoking, stimulating and funny (at times).

Thurston has a very open and positive approach.  And this is also reflected by the panel participants.  In many respects while the subject is ‘black’ the theme could be ‘how to be …anything?’.  The message is that it’s up to the individual to make the experience positive.

Notwithstanding all of this, the book does not shy away from discrimination experienced by black people.  And Thurston’s own upbringing, his father having been shot when he was only a boy, by a far sighted mother who was ambitious for him is well documented.  The combination of attending the private school (Sidwell) while learning about his black roots and customs is brilliantly contrasted.

Well worth taking the time to read or listen to.

 

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