Adopting the emerging healthcare technologies

Emerging healthcare technologies: not a surprising piece. The focus is on Electronic Health Record (EHR), Cyber security, Accountable Care Organisations, Population Health analytics, Remote care, mobile and wearable technologies.

Mobile, cloud, analytics – all core to developing and delivering effective and efficient healthcare solutions.  And, of course, given the current cyber security threats, security is a prerequisite in implementing and expanding dependence on technologies such as cloud and mobile.

Seems that the electronic health record must be a core foundation of making all of this work for the patient, healthcare providers and society at large.  We need a way to aggregate, consolidate, cross correlate the data. This will provide better solutions for patients and improved care.  But this access for providers to patient data should be controlled by the patient.

Security

I have always thought of security as an enabler rather than a hindrance or obstruction.  Cloud and mobile in healthcare make this case.  Interestingly i see cloud as offering greater security – with the opportunity to leverage real in-depth security expertise, not necessarily available internally to healthcare providers.  And cloud and hosted solutions offer lots of simplifications in supporting mobile access to data.

Analytics

Much of what we have seen drive data analytics has come out of the mobile/ cloud/ social developments – tracking and analysis of data captured on mobile devices and through end user participation in social platforms.  Healthcare is data intensive – with more and more of the data captured electronically and potentially available for analysis.  The tools for capturing the data and the tools for storing, analysing and displaying the data have advanced hugely in recent years.  Providers who do not have the ability to capture/ analyse/ understand the data will find themselves significantly disadvantaged in competing with other providers and negotiating with buyers of their services (patients, insurers, government, whoever).

Challenges

Great opportunities for all healthcare providers to improve the quality and relevance of their offerings, the method of delivering their services and to acquire new business remotely  -through new healthcare technologies.  But the challenges should  not be underestimated – traditional models for Information Technology delivery will prevent organisations leveraging the opportunities available. Providers need to be more dynamics, adopt new technologies and new methods of delivery.

 

 

Day 5 M2M

Sitting here with rest of the gang in Innishowen Gateway Hotel in Buncrana, having had sandwiches and soup.

image

About to head off at 1.30 for the last 40km to Main Head.

Joined by Prof. Hill for the last leg. Great sense of achievement for the group.

image

And the beautiful weather has lasted the 5 days.

M2M Day 1 cycling

Of course Day 1 actually start in Kilmacud Crokes at 4.30am.

After a 7 hour bus ride we hooked up with the support team at Mizen Head, unwrapped our bikes and set out.  A broken chain within 1 minute and a puncture within 1 km of the start tested everyone’s resolve and patience.  But after this we got going and headed off to cycle through breathtaking scenery of West Cork and South Kerry.

A demanding route for day 1 of the M2M – through Durrus, Bantry, Glengarriff and Kenmare.  Two tough climbs for the group – Caha Pass (Glengarriff to Kenmare) and Moll’s Gap, Kenmare to Killarney.  The descent from Moll’s Gap takes in the stunning views from Ladies’ View and some beautiful views of the Lake as we pressed closer to Killarney.

wp-1464872248425.jpgAnd at the end of the day, the run in from the bottom of Moll’s Gap through to Killarney tested the group.

We stayed in the Killarney Plaza – and a quiet night was had by all: knowing four more days cycling ahead in the M2M.